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In May 1919, as war in Europe drew to an end, civil rights leader W.E.B. Du Bois foresaw a bigger fight at home: “By the God of Heaven, we are cowards and jackasses if now that the war is over, we do not marshal every ounce of our brain and brawn to fight a sterner, longer, more unbending battle against the forces of hell in our own land.” Within weeks, simmering racial tension erupted in Chicago’s “Red Summer” riots. The militia restored order. The underlying discrimination persists. Photo submitted
John Jacoby, Contributing Columnist
John Jacoby, Contributing Columnist
5:00 am CDT March 10, 2020
• June 8, 1912: Another insolent Chicagoan got his comeuppance when he visited Wilmette this evening.